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Exploring a Model for Training Simulations

Abstract:

There has been ongoing discussion about possibility (or futility) of developing a typology of training simulations. However, there are opportunities to consider a model of categorising training simulations. A common thread across the debate is the complexity of simulations and the broad range of areas that training simulations applied in. Therefore, as a first step to developing a typology of simulations, a number of pre-existing concepts have been collated to navigate the complexity. The process of decision making involves four steps. The first is the level of immersion required (Tactical, Strategic or Narrative). Second, is to consider the complexity of the simulation; the complexity relates to the level of problem solving and the number of participants in the simulation. Third, is to consider the degree of abstraction required for the simulation. Fourth, is to identify the model of simulation (Live, Virtual, Constructive). Considering these aspects provides a model for exploring the types of simulation that are appropriate to a particular situation. The model has been used to categorise common simulation types and to develop a tool to assist in making decisions about what simulations to use in learning and development activities as well as when considering the reuse/repurposing of simulations.

Authors/Affiliation:

Melanie Worrall/Klevar

Deanna Hutchinson/The Simulation Agency

Submitted to:

SimTecT Conference

Year:

2014

Simulated Social Interaction: Managing The Dissonance Of Social And Economic Transformation In The Public Domain

Abstract:

There is a wide social and economic transformation from the hierarchical structures and industrial relationships with their roots in the nineteenth century mercantile capitalism to a more networked and heterarchical society (de Vulpian 2005, Crawford et Al 2009) that is in transition – socially, economically and culturally Already more agile leaders are ‘sensing possibilities and catalysing change’ by creating more suitable forms of organizational structures to enable transformative processes (E.g.Google, Zappas).

Dissonance, that uncomfortable feeling that the usual way of thinking and doing no longer work as well as they need to, is a symptom of these changes and also of a readiness to explore new ways of doing things. Several emerging trends are indicative of the cultural, social and economic transitions that are underway. These include: increasing participation in social media, multiplayer games, global social interaction and knowledge sharing. These changes represent emerging ways of meeting needs for wellbeing, learning, and to make a living.

Simulation is currently used to provide experiences that are not easily accessible to people as a way to enable them to learn about a real situation or perform a prescribed task. The popularity of multiplayer games involving heroic journeys by teams suggests a growing societal need for these exploratory pattern sensing experiences in the population – a need to learn to work in non-homo-social teams and to work in volatile and unknown contexts. This paper explores social media and multiplayer games as socio-cultural simulations that are arising as a response to change and asks questions about how these communication media can also inform the use of simulation as a tool for enabling organizational change including broader participation in informed decision making, and changed roles, rules and expectations for people in organizations.

Authors/Affiliation:

Dr Kate Crawford/Eviva

Deanna Hutchinson/The Simulation Agency

Submitted to:

SimTecT Conference

Year:

2014

Repurposing defence-based serious games to support induction training in the resources sector the lessons learnt from Project Canary

Abstract:

This paper will report on the actual process of repurposing a defence simulation tool to support induction training in the resources sector. A groundbreaking project on an international scale, Project Canary was built on the VBS2 engine by QinetiQ for the Mining Industry Skills Centre, and launched in (2009) amidst a booming resources sector. Four years on, the disruptive nature of this project is better understood, and the growing prevalence of serious games in heavy industry reflects the relevance of this work. The research goal for this paper was to illustrate how serious games could be used to develop appropriate behaviour within employees around safety critical decision-making in the context of general safety inductions. It addresses four questions: 1) how and to what degree using a defence tool helps overcome cultural barriers associated with bringing games technology to legislation-driven training 2) how to design the tool to maximise learning outcomes and training efficiency,3) how to scale the tool to meet multiple training requirements and 4) how to deliver a commercially viable outcome for the business. The paper highlights issues emerging across the life cycle of the two-year project, from conception to implementation, covering the stages of learning design, concept development, vendor sourcing and acquisition, team formation, scenario design, commercialisation, marketing and training. Key insights relate to the unexpected cultural barriers and skills gaps that emerged from bringing defence capabilities to a sector that is usually considered to have a considerable appetite for innovation.

Authors/Affiliation:

Deanna Hutchinson/The Simulation Agency

Submitted to:

SimTecT conference

Year:

2013

 

Its all greek to me – crossing domain-specific boundaries to grow an internatinal simulation community

Abstract:

Just as Servilius Casca in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar said “it was Greek to me” in reference to his inability to understand the true meaning of a dialogue he was party to, so might the broader business and academic community feel excluded from simulation dialogue because of a language barrier. However this barrier does not originate in geographic or racial differences, but is directly related to the rules and boundaries of particular work and social groupings as well as the psychology of professional domains including engineering, IT and education. Joining the simulation community has been described as jumping “through the looking glass” – there’s a whole new exciting world that can’t be un-known once experienced. The challenge facing who have made the jump, lies in encouraging others with shared interests to also make that leap of faith. The simulation industry internationally has been organised around representative entities that leverage annual conferences as key channels for connecting with current and future audiences. History shows that splinter groups have been highly effective in establishing new niches while more established entities have begun diversifying beyond traditional markets to incorporate newer emergent professions and industries. The simulation industry in Australia continues to demonstrate leadership in the multi-sector engagement model, perhaps because of the particular characteristics of the marketplace – including its comparatively small size. Regardless of the reason, the level of activity means the region is a logical starting point for a study about crossing language barriers to grow the community. This paper will examine the performance of the SimTecT conferences between the years 2002 and 2012 through the lenses of society and culture, language philosophy and linguistics, with a view to identifying strategies for more effective community engagement. The paper will highlight the role of SimTecT in growing the community, as well as analyse various elements of SimTecT as an event to identify its their communication value and effectiveness. Particular attention will be paid to the nuances of language and how this has developed over the given period.

Authors/Affiliation:

Deanna Hutchinson, Christabel Strong, Nicolette Johnson/The Simulation Agency

Submitted to:

SimTecT Conference

Year:

2013

Digicon – it’s not digital but it is confronting

Abstract:

Designing games for learning is a complex process requiring deep understanding of socio-cultural elements to be represented in the activity, as well as knowledge of technologies with which to bring the action to life. Digicon is a leadership training simulation- game. It uses no digital technology, yet generates intense discussion about topics as diverse as linguistic competence, learned helplessness and behavioural inhibitions.

In the context of a conference on digital games and interactive entertainment, Digicon is link between a pre-digital age when designers of games for learning relied solely on analysis and imagination to create synthetic environments such as those now available via large-scale technology-supported learning activities.

Games and simulations have long provided learning opportunities. In the 21st Century play and fun are more widely accepted as valid learning strategies than in the 19th and 20th centuries. However, while there is much design-oriented knowledge available to educators and game designers, there are big gaps in awareness of relationships among various forms of play for learning. Digicon dates from a pre-digital games era, yet models the continuity of design and application principles in using games for learning.

Authors/Affiliation:

Dr Elyssebeth Leigh/FEIS University of Wollongong

Deanna Hutchinson/Simpublica

Submitted to:

IE ’14, Dec 2 – Dec 3 2014, Newcastle, AU, Australia.

Year:

2014

considerations for serious games use in safety culture improvement in the resources industry

Abstract

This paper will report on the actual process of creating a training simulation and the learning outcome considerations in the design and development of a simulation reconstructing a typical mining industry accident. The simulation application sought to illustrate how such a technique could be used to develop appropriate behaviour within trainees around safety critical decision making in the context of understanding potential hazardous outcomes of inappropriate decisions. This paper describes the approach taken by the development team to address three areas;1) how and with what degree of facilitation should the scenario be delivered to the trainees, 2) how the tool should be used to identify training requirements, and 3) considerations for the use and adoption of the methodology in an industry which is relatively immature in its use of simulation beyond operator in the loop training simulators.

Authors/Affiliation:

Deanna Christof /Mining Industry Skills Centre

Gary Eves/QinetiQ Consulting Pty Ltd

Submitted to:

SimTecT Conference

Year:

2009

Closing The Loop – Embedding VVA as bridge

Abstract

Traditionally the validation, verification and accreditation framework is employed to help define, test and accredit simulations against organisational requirements. VV&A is often thought about in terms of describing what a simulation needs to do and how; the relationship to change management is focused on controlling changes associated with adding or removing functionality, updates and modifications, acceptance testing. These are the Little C changes. But how is VV&A affected by the Big C changes like organisational readiness, deployment, staff training, and how these affect the design, acquisition and through-life support of your simulation? Simulation projects have reported disparity between subject matter experts and developers as a leading cause of schedule and budget blow-outs, with many projects experiencing some level of customer dissatisfaction with the final product, believed to be a result of poor articulation of needs. By intertwining the Big C and Little C change processes with a solid VV&A structure, are we able to predict and therefore overcome some of these change barriers for simulation? This paper explores the relationship between Big C changes and VV&A in contrast to Little C changes. It proposes a model for embedding VV&A as the connecting framework between Big C and Little C changes, as a mechanism for designing simulations to match customer expectations within the reality of their operating context.

Authors/Affiliation:

Deanna Hutchinson; Dr Elyssebeth Leigh; Roger Mulligan; Nicole Jones de Rooy/

The Simulation Agency; University of Woollongong

Submitted to:

SimTecT conference

Year:

2014

Can Simulation Replace On The Job Training?

 Abstract:

Simulation is rapidly becoming recognised as an integral part of the future of training in the resources industry. From heavy equipment, to rescue, to maintenance, we will see this technology being increasingly used to safely prepare our workforce for a variety of roles. Certainly there are examples of incidents where simulation training can be attributed to the avoidance of disastrous results. But how do we ensure confidence in the safety outcomes of simulation training in our industry?

Authors/Affiliation:

Deanna Hutchinson and Christine Jones/Mining Industry Skills Centre Inc

Submitted to:

Queensland Mining Industry Health and Safety Conference

Year:

2008